Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis Discharge Instructions

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Hospital to Home:

Generally 3-4 days

Diet:

  • High fiber and high protein- encourage small frequent meals with plenty of hydration.
  • Minimum of 6-8 glasses of water daily.

Activity:

  • Encourage getting moving.
  • Daily 60 minute walks which can be broken down into 6 ten minute intervals.
  • Physical therapy exercises three times a day.

Medications:

  • Refer to the calendar provided by the pain service that references weaning off medications.
  • Continue stool softeners if you are on narcotics to prevent constipation.

Restrictions:

  • NO Physical Education for at least 6 months.
  • NO spine twisting/torsion.
  • NO IBUPROFEN, aspirin, or naprosyn products for 6 months post operatively.
  • No driving for 6 weeks then may return if off all narcotics and physically able to slam on breaks.
  • Do not carry more than 10 pounds.
  • NO backpacks.

Shower:
Your doctor will let you know when you can shower.

School:

  • Most patients can return to school full time in 2-4 weeks and may return sooner if you wish.
  • Refer to back to school note: do not carry more than 10 pounds on your back, no back packs, 2nd set of books, 5 minutes in between classes.
  • NO PE for six months to one year.

Incision care:

  • No creams, lotions or ointments to incision site.
  • Keep incision site out of sun by covering for two weeks post surgery and limit sun exposure during first year. Use sun block of SPF 50.

When to call the DOCTOR?

  • Fevers greater than 101.5
  • Vomiting
  • Significant weight loss after 2 weeks after surgery
  • Incision site redness, warmth or drainage
  • Numbness tingling or weakness in your arms or legs
  • Persistent constipation
  • Rash
  • Increased pain not relieved by pain medication
  • Patients MUST call prior to any dental procedures or surgical procedures for 2 years after surgery. We will give antibiotics prior to procedure to prevent any risk of infection.
  • If you have a postoperative problem that is treated by your primary care physician or pediatrician.

When to Follow Up?

  • Six weeks, follow-ups after are determined by your doctor.

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